“RETIREMENT – PLANNING AND STRUCTURE”

I sometimes like to look back into the past and see the results of my actions or inactions.  What effect did my decisions have on the goals that I had set forth?

I didn’t walk 20 miles in the snow to get my education.  I only lived 3 1/2 miles from school and I either rode the school bus or my parents took me.  When I got a little older and owned a bicycle, I had new transportation that made my daily schedule a little more  flexible.  Then, I was able to buy  a used car, and the quality of  my transportation changed.

Even as a teenager, attending school or going to town required planning.  I had the choice of two routes.  One route required me to travel on a dirt road for 1 mile to get to the  pavement.  The other route was 2 miles from the city streets.  Of course, when riding a bicycle, then sooner I could get out of sandy roads and be on pavement made the trip faster and easier.  There was a stretch of road we called “corduroy” because of the wavy condition.  It wasn’t too bad on a bicycle, but it would jar your teeth in a car unless you drove very slow.

In financial planning I realized that many times developing and following a retirement plan is much like the paragraphs above.  A decision must be made in the planning to reach your retirement goals.  The structure of the plan must have the flexibility to  adjust for the bumpy roads you may encounter as you travel the road to retirement.

PLAN AND ORGANIZE

  •  Plan to plan.  Give time for planning and  organizing.
  • Determine your primary purpose.  What’s the big picture?  What are you trying to do?
  • Assess the situation.  Understand where you sit before trying to develop a strategy.
  • Prioritize the needs.  Make sure all parties involved agree on the most important goals.
  • Ask the right questions.  Ask about market, leadership, income, reporting, evaluation.
  • Set specific goals.  Write goals that are realistic, measurable, flexible.
  • Clarify and communicate.  Communication links planning and  implementation.
  • Identify possible obstacles.  Mentally walk through all you are trying to accomplish.
  • Have an open system approach to you planning.  Be sympathetic to your circumstances.
  • Schedule everything you can.  Get things on the calendar and set deadlines.
  • Budget everything you can.  Determine both the costs and due dates of obligations.
  • Monitor and correct.  Progress is lake a canoe trip; constantly adjust your course.
  • Study the results.  Evaluation prevents stagnation and exaggeration.

IN ORDER TO STEER THE SHIP, IT TAKES PLANNING TO CHART THE COURSE.

As a financial advisor, this is what I do each  and every day.  Contact me by visiting my website and completing the contact information.

http://burrowsfinancial.thebetterretirementplan.com

*****

Numbers 2:1-34

After Moses led his people out of Egypt and into the wilderness he needed to  plan and organize.  He had twelve tribes to plan for with all the needs and problems they encountered in the wilderness.  His planning was essentially the same as we encounter today to set our retirement goals and making sure that we can remain retired.

Have a great day!

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: